“Desiccation” on Offer This Weekend #kindledeals #Freereadstoday

This weekend I’m in the mood to give away yet another freebie to entertain people during lockdown. This follows on my free eBook deal three weeks ago. Many thanks for all those lovelies who downloaded Noah Padgett and the Dog-People onto their Kindles, and also to those who decided to buy the paperback version instead 🙂

The Kindle free offer for my novel Desiccation is for today and tomorrow (June 6-7) worldwide on Amazon. Here’s my Booklinker url that should work for most of you (myBook.to/QuirkyLit). If not, just go and type the book title and my name into the Amazon search bar.

Desiccation (published in 2015) is a mix of science fiction and urban fantasy suitable for anyone over the age of thirteen. As with my Noah Padgett novel, I suspect that most of my readers have been adults, despite it being listed as a young adult novel.

See below my blurb for Desiccation, as shown on my Amazon product page…

ST TRINIAN’S meets INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS

In 1967, mayhem erupts at an elite English boarding school.

The head girl Samantha is a sociopath, determined to exploit every loophole in the system. After her venture to set up a nocturnal brothel in the gymnasium proves a flop, she invites a disgruntled customer – mod gang-leader, Joe – to a midnight séance in the library. But she hasn’t bargained on his becoming the conduit for a powerful malign force bent upon the destruction of worlds.

The teachers and pupils soon undergo extreme personality changes and develop a hive mentality, determined to ensnare everyone into its collective conscience. When science scholarship girl Janet fights back, she becomes the despised outsider, shunned by the hive but stalked by the head girl, who no longer speaks in her own voice but that of the delinquent mod Janet has seen hanging around the school.

In mortal terror and with her credulity already stretched to the limit, can she throw her trust upon the hippie pixie that lives in a gargantuan psychedelic toadstool behind the school swimming pool and who claims he’s an expert in repairing interdimensional rifts?

Book Review: And the Blind Shall See (William D. Holland)

William D. Holland’s memoir And the Blind Shall See is a story that scans six decades. Throughout his first nine months, William was blind. He had passed through nine different foster homes, during which time he had experienced little by way of stimulation or love, causing him to suffer Failure to Thrive Syndrome. Finally, a couple adopted him and offered him all the love, security, and stimulation he needed, which resulted in him gaining his sight.

As can be the case with adopted children, there is often an underlying insecurity and propensity towards self-destructive behaviour, even when they are in receipt of much love and reassurance. William’s adoptive parents raised him to know right from wrong, have good manners, to care for his neighbour, help the underdog etc. Consequently, he grew up wanting to help other people, whether in his work or in a voluntary basis out in the community. But he was never able to shake off an underlying melancholy, which erupted into uncontrollable grief over the sudden death of his father. It was then that he turned to the bottle and started his courtship with that self-destructive demon, alcohol. What followed, was a battle that lasted several decades, destroying relationships, losing him jobs, until finally he managed to swear off drink permanently, with the support of his wonderful current wife.

What I loved the most about this book is that the author has made no attempt to paper over the cracks as he lays bare the devastation his addiction to the bottle reaped upon himself and those who cared about him. We read of a man who had regained his physical sight but was still in effect blind. He had been rejected at birth, which meant he could be rejected again, and again, and again. This fear drove him to the bottle. The bottle gave him false confidence and hoodwinked him into believing himself clever, witty, popular, desirable, when in fact it was having the reverse effect and destroying his relationships, his career as a teacher, and his mental health.

On a personal level, this book gave me an insight into something that had puzzled me for many years and enabled me to lay to rest one almighty ghost in my own life, which in turn has led to forgiveness. Although I understood why people might hit the bottle when they had nothing to live for, I could not understand why they would do so when they had everything to live for. Furthermore, the whole notion of high-functioning alcoholics baffled me further. Thanks to William’s testimony, I now know the answer to these questions. Alcoholism is an illness and needs treating as such, just as heart disease, or cancer are illnesses. Alcoholism reaps havoc not only on the sufferer but upon their families and loved ones.

If you want to get a real good look inside the head of an alcoholic, whether you are an alcoholic in denial or a victim of that alcoholic, or a therapist working with alcoholics, this is the book for you. Even if you are none of these things, this is a mightily moving and inspirational memoir, written by a wonderful human being. William D. Holland, you are officially a hero.

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A former teacher, former business owner, former fill-in-the-blanks with dozens of other jobs, William D Holland (Bill) can now be found in Olympia, Washington, writing, gardening, walking his dogs, and living a very simple life with his wife, Bev.

And the Blind Shall See (amazon.com & amazon.co.uk) is a radical departure from his normal fiction, which includes eight novels, mostly dealing with the eternal struggle of good vs evil.

To find out more about Bill, do check out his two blogs Artistry with Words and The Art of Living Simple.

Perspectives #Haikai

In this space, my form.
Inhale ~ pause ~ exhale.
My moment, that's all.
Close by bumble-bee
locked in buzz pollination.
Its moment, that's all.  
Mid-distant birds swoop
upon windwoosh air currents.
Their moment, that's all.
Far-off faux hornet,
motorcyclist races time.
His moment, that's all.
Beyond orbs, dark space.
Airless, lightless, void between.
Our moments are all.

#Friday Fictioneers — The Scourge

Genre: Dystopian
Word Count: 100

THE SCOURGE

After the floods and gales, pestilence descended, and you had to pretend you were ill or get eaten. It began with the homeless and the already forgotten, those without symptoms and too aimless to feign the tell-tale cough.

Not so Vince, with his filched pot of pepper and his begging tin filled with dried butter beans from the dumpster. I remember his contagion act all too well. The raw eyes and the pepper sneeze. The butter bean chest rattle.

I never let on. Being a vegetarian with allergic rhinitis, why would I? We were the last two survivors, the obsolete.

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Friday Fictioneers: 100 word stories
Photo Prompt: image copyright (c) Roger Bultot

                

Book Review: Taz — Tales of a Rascal Pooch by Michael J. Dibden

I’m so excited to share my review of this fabulous non-fiction book by debut author, Michael J. Dibden, especially after my involvement as a beta-reader during its pre-publication stage. Below is what I had to say on Amazon and on Goodreads, where I awarded it five stars.

Taz – Tales of a Rascal Pooch is a humorous biography, told from the alternating viewpoints of the rascal pooch and his owners who he refers to individually as “The Suit” and “Ms Noodle”, or both together as “the hoomans”.

The story has its sad moments where I fought back a tear or two (no spoilers here), but mostly it had me laughing out loud. Taz does his utmost to play his new hoomans, who, although experienced dog owners in the past, have never had to handle an uncouth Staffordshire Bull Terrier who makes it his mission to train them, rather than the other way around. As an ex-stud dog, he has sex on his mind and a habit of humping the air at the most inopportune moments. The same goes for his dispensing of foul odours. He swears a lot, too, so please don’t buy this book and then complain afterwards, when you’ve been warned. If Taz could talk, this is how he’d sound – in other words, it’s authentic characterisation.

It is a well-written book, which, although memoir, has the pacing, spot-on characterisation, sense of setting, and realistic dialogue to be found in some of the best humorous novels. I think the story would appeal best to dog-owners, although it is also possibly a story for those who enjoy true stories that demonstrate canine loyalty towards their owners — a dog’s ability to know when its owners need it to temper its excesses and transform itself into a caring and tender creature of vast understanding.

A highly recommended read.   

Taz — Tales of a Rascal Pooch is available both in paperback and kindle versions at Amazon (UK) & Amazon (US), and other Amazon sites worldwide.