Sarah Potter Writes

Pursued by the Muses of prose, poetry, and music.

Friday Fictioneers — Boy Enfolded

 

PHOTO PROMPT © Björn Rudeberg

She wears a green satin dress, the cello cocooned in the shimmering folds of its skirt. Her skin is flawless ivory. The waves of her chestnut hair tease her back as she draws the bow across the strings. Elgar’s cello concerto.

He’s eight-years-old. Serious. His eyes are like saucers behind his round glasses as he sits too close to the television, in awe of her. There’s no delineation between her and the music; they are one and same, both spellbinding in their beauty. She’s nine years his senior, but too perfect to be anybody’s older sister.

1994. Natalie Clein. His first love.

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In 1994, cellist, Natalie Clein won BBC Young Musician of the Year at the age of 17. Here is a video of her playing a the 3rd Movement of the Elgar cello concerto 14 years later in 2008.

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Friday Fictioneers: 100 word stories
Photo prompt: image (c) Björn Rudberg

 

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24 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers — Boy Enfolded

  1. Sunshine Jansen on said:

    I do not blame him one little bit. Wow.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. So movingly ethereal. One human being’s talent can send us all soaring. She not only feels the music. She is the music. Makes me cry~

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Beautiful piece – and such evocative imagery.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. She is feeling every note.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Lovely take. Beautiful music too, thanks for the watch as well as the read 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  6. A delightful take on the prompt. The first line is gorgeous! Really draws the reader into a fine story.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I can see why he was captivated and you have captured that captivation perfectly 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  8. You can be so mesmerized by a good musician, and if she is young and beautiful so much more. I once saw Ann Sophie Mutter and that was fantastic.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Dear Sarah,

    I love seeing her through the eyes of her younger brother. Lots of layers to the story. Great descriptions. Brava!

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rochelle
      I’m glad you loved the descriptions. Actually, the boy in the story was my son when he was 8, seeing her on the TV and falling in love with her. He and his older sister (5 years’ his senior) used to squabble like mad at that time, so Natalie Clein was like some angel who couldn’t possibly be a bossy older sister to a small boy! I can see why you read it the way you did, and it works whichever way you interpret it. The beauty of fiction is that it’s open to interpretation and says different things to different people.
      All best wishes
      Sarah

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ah, thank you for the clarification. Although I think your son might’ve been disappointed if Natalie were his older sister. 😉 Siblings are siblings are siblings. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Awww…what a wonderful story!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I can see why the little boy fell in love, mesmerised as he was by such beauty in Natalie’s expression, the music, the playing sublime. Dearest Sarah, your flash fiction is so beautiful, it brought a tear to my eye. Thank you too for the video clip, just what I needed to listen to… love & hugs to you my dear friend ❤ xxxxxxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad you enjoyed my story, Sherri. And can I say that I’m glad I brought a tear to your eye? Of course, my flash fiction offering on this occasion was a little true life cameo of my own boy when he was little! One of many sweet memories 🙂 …Love and hugs to you, too, my dear friend xxxxxxx

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, you certainly can, because it shows the power of your beautiful writing dearest Sarah. I didn’t realise it was based on your boy’s experience…that makes it even more lovely and moving. A sweet and precious memory indeed. Have a wonderful weekend my friend, and love and hugs back to you 🙂 xxxxxxx

        Liked by 1 person

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