Sarah Potter Writes

Pursued by the Muses of prose and poetry

Friday Fictioneers — A Girl Named Ivy

Genre: Metaphorical fiction
Word Count: 100

A GIRL NAMED IVY

He was the rock upon which she depended, and she the roots that kept him grounded. Her shoots started out tiny and controllable. He drip-fed them and kept her all to himself, pruning her into shape with his clipped truth.

Over time, his credibility diminished and her urge to grow escalated. “I want to see the sun,” she told him, as she clawed at his shade.

“It will burn you up,” he said, knowing that she was about to knock the top off his world.

She reached for the sky, eroding and suffocating him.

Behold that ruin she can’t escape.

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 Friday Fictioneers: 100 word stories
Photo Prompt: copyright © Roger Bulltot 

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42 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers — A Girl Named Ivy

  1. Welcome back, Sarah! So good to see you writing and sharing again. Before I saw the subheading saying “metaphorical” I read your work and thought it was definitely metaphorical, and well-done for sure. I love this….seen it…hell, probably lived it. 🙂

    Have a fantastic weekend, my friend.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m happy to be back, Bill! Have missed my blogging friends, but definitely needed some fresh air and a break from my computer, as I was in non-creative lockdown.
      If you’ve lived that metaphor, I’m glad you’ve survived it!
      You have a fantastic weekend, too, my friend 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This was brilliant, Sarah. I have so been that Ivy…

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Personifying ivy without a predictable itch, great take on the prompt, Sarah.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I am feeling like this is what a woman who is suffocating under her husband’s shadow is like. It may be metaphorical, but it has great imagery to me. Well done in capturing my imagination with it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice metaphorical use of the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Does she call him “Dad”?

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Ooh, rich! I see at least one other metaphor, of a more generally existentialist nature, so this strikes me as a most successful metaphorical foray (metaphoray?) indeed! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Double LIKE. This is really a poetic take on the prompt. Like a ballad almost.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. knowing that she was about to knock the top off his world – my favorite line among many. Delicious take on the prompt. One of your best, me thinks.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Love this, an excellent take on the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Very intriguing POV here. Could just envision it so very well. 🙂 ❤ Really enjoyed it.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’ve seen marriages like this. I don’t believe either partner should try to contain the other. They should intertwine and grow together. It makes the cord much harder to break.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lovely to hear you say this, and what a shame more people don’t follow your principles. All too often I’ve seen men or women being “forced” by their partner to give up their interests, despite them having had those interests when they first met and, presumably, fell in love. It makes no sense, unless the interest is something criminal or seriously destructive of course.

      Like

  13. Dear Sarah,

    I can so relate to Ivy. Beautifully written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Splendid metaphor. I loved the phrase ‘clawed at his shade’; ivy is so destructive, and that’s just what it does.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I love the metaphor… and to some extent it reminds me of Pygmalion… the pupil outgrowing the teacher…

    Liked by 1 person

  16. So even if she breaks free her past remains entwined with him? Maybe one day that decaying foundation will crumble away leaving her free.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Love your analogies, symbolism. Thought-provoking aspect of human relationships.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. What a brilliant description of a dysfunctional relationship.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Happens in real life 🙂 Thank you for the beautiful story.

    Liked by 1 person

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