Sarah Potter Writes

Pursued by the Muses of prose, poetry, and music.

Friday Fictioneers — Dreams & Inventions

silo-has-come

Often my mind returns to those fields where we lay gazing at the sky, sharing our dreams. Why couldn’t you have stayed with me and lived the simple life, tilling the soil, living in harmony with nature?

Instead, you became a scientist employed at a Government research facility, where you invented a device to regulate abnormal cell growth in the human body and cure all forms of cancer.

Terrorists modified the device for war but neither side won.

Us survivors live underground, unable to endure sunlight upon our mutated forms. We live off worms and dream of a time machine.

Β #

Friday Fictioneers: 100 word stories
Photo prompt: image Β© Marie Gail Stratford

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61 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers — Dreams & Inventions

  1. Ewww! (that’s my response to eating worms)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lots of proteins in them there worms… πŸ˜‰
    Scary thought. Damned terrorists. Always have to come in and muck up whatever good there is!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The trouble with terrorists is that from their point of view they’re freedom fighters. So sad that we can’t find a middle road and live in peace but as long as there’s inequality and we have opinions to express, I guess this won’t happen.

      Like

  3. Wow, this story is so powerful in so few words. I agree about the ick-factor in eating worms. That aside, here is a person who loves nature and regrets the path a loved one took–a path that destroyed their relationship and all that s/he treasured. Wow.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. The picture is very fitting for an apocalyptic story Sarah. You had me fooled with the first paragraph, I thought it was going to be wistful and romantic, I should have known better πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Wow! This is very scary. Good story though, Sarah. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  6. We have to be careful what we invent. It could have the power to destroy the world. Perhaps we have already invented what is going to end the world. I’d better practice eating worms.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Ooh, that’s actually a better synopsis for the novel Wool than the blurb on the cover!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Whoops, is that what Wool is about? I’ve got a copy of the novel but haven’t read it yet. If it’s the same story, it’s a total coincidence and a case of great minds think alike. Just shows there’s nothing totally original out there. Let’s hope I end up making as much money as Hugh Howey!

      Like

  8. Awesome Sarah – what an apocalyptic thought that is 😦

    Liked by 1 person

  9. So sad – in war there are no winners.. But this is worse than many others.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I guess one could get used to eating worms – or not. I agree with your character. Leave well enough alone. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Even in this day and age, there’s a great difference between cultures as to what is considered disgusting or not, food-wise. For instance, in Japan they eat wasp crackers. A hunter-gatherer would eat woodlouse. A starving person would eat anything that kept them alive. If you can stop your food wriggling or crawling, then it’s less humungous than a meal that won’t keep still!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. A stunning story! Loved the tone and the sadness of their plight. The ending, “We live off worms and dream of a time machine,” is perfect.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. a short story but oh so powerful Sarah! A cautionary tale for sure!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. A powerful story. Even research done with the best of intentions can be twisted to evil ends.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. A lovely but kind of sad story dear Sarah. Always love what you bring for Friday fictioneers. How is your dream book going on?

    Swetank.
    Be Bettr, STay Bettr!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Swetank πŸ™‚ My book is going just fine, although not as fast as I would like as there are too many distractions. I’m trying to do two hours work on it a day before I do anything else. It seems to be working.
      I hope everything is going well for you.
      All best wishes
      Sarah

      Liked by 1 person

      • I am eager to read it soon .. can you tell me few things about it. What is the genre and anything else.. please..please!

        Swetank.
        Be Bettr, Stay Bettr! πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      • The novel is crossover urban fantasy set in a girl’s boarding school in 1967 (crossover meaning that it’s suitable for older teenagers and adults).
        Strange things happen after the head girl conducts a seance and lets something dangerous through from another dimension.
        I will probably have a go self-publishing this novel, at the same time as trying to place my more recent novel with literary agents. It’s very hard to get anywhere down the traditional route, so I must keep other options open.
        Of course, I will keep you up-to-date with any progress on either front. And good to see that you are so eager to read my work. Thanks:-)
        All best wishes
        Sarah

        Like

  15. Great take on the prompt. I liked it. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  16. A sad story. I liked your ending about the time machine.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Interesting story and a cautionary tale with some truth behind it. One gammar note: The final paragraph should begin with “we” instead of “us.”

    Good work.

    All my best,
    MG

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’ve created a problem for me here, MG. If I replace “us” with “we”, it might improve the “gammar” (grammar!) but it will leave me with two consecutive sentences beginning with the same word. I think I’ll leave it as it is and put it down to authentic characterisation and the fact that my protagonist hasn’t been to school πŸ˜‰
      Thanks for pointing out this rule. I’ve just Googled on the subject. Of course, you’re right and that’s why writers need editors, as it’s impossible to know everything.
      All best wishes
      Sarah

      Like

      • I thought you wrote “Us” instead of “We” on purpose to reflect their speech…

        BTW… love your new photo!

        Liked by 1 person

      • It’s how I heard the protagonist’s voice in my head. So yes, it did reflect her speech. I’m just wondering how my novel (under edit) will go down in the US, with its turns of phrase and slang from the 60s, especially when it comes to the London mods.
        Thanks, re the photo. My son took it the other day, when I was relaxing in the sunshine in my favourite spot outside the kitchen.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Well I hope they leave well enough alone! Which they should if you are portraying a dialect or regional slang!
        Well you can tell him he did a wonderful job!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Who can you trust, if not oncologists?

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Dear Sarah,

    You’ve told a lot of story in a short space. As dynamite comes in small packages, your story is powerful and explosive. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Rochelle
      Thank you. I’m sure there are some brief outlines to novels in some of my 100 word stories. If there are, they will eventually insist upon me bulking them out by 70K+ words. It has happened to me before!
      I love your analogy re dynamite πŸ™‚
      All best wishes
      Sarah

      Like

  20. You had me fooled with this one Sarah, but then I’m not at all surprised. What a terrible thought, to end up like that when it all started out so noble and filled with promise. Always the darkness lurking. As for eating worms, horrid, but I suppose if that’s all there is. And I noticed your lovely new photo, scrolling down to catch up with your posts… πŸ™‚ xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Fooled but for a moment, Sherri. I think that my stories often have darkness lurking, as I walk through life seeing much that’s beautiful, while at the same time being painfully aware of a shadow at my shoulder. This is probably why I’m a realist rather than an optimist, and writing fantasy/speculative my safe area to escape to and explore darkness and light. xxxx

      Like

      • I love how you put this Sarah, and I feel just the same way as you express the same reasons why I veer back into the shadows when I write flash fiction. You are so right about the difference between being an optimist and a realist. Which, as we both know, is far from being negative and doom and gloom. A I am beginning to understand this through writing fiction just how it helps me cope with that permanent feeling of living life waiting for the ‘other shoe to drop’. It’s great having our escape routes isn’t it? Big hugs…xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Escape routes are a must, as long as we don’t disappear into them permanently. Big hugs to you, too, dear Sherri. xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

      • So very true dear Sarah, and so very wise. Feeling those hugs πŸ™‚ xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

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