Book Review: The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga

The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga 
My Rating: 5 of 5 stars

In the past, I’ve ploughed at a snail’s pace through Man Booker Prize winning novels or abandoned them altogether. Thus, when a friend lent me their copy of the 2008 winning novel The White Tiger, I opened it without much optimism but, to my amazement, found myself hooked from the first page.

The story is set in India, and takes place over a period of one week (the same length of time I took to read the book!). It opens with the main character, Balram, writing the start of an “autobiographical” letter to His Excellency Wen Jiabao from China, who is due to visit India the following week.

What follows is an extraordinary tale of a rather disreputable character, who calls himself an entrepreneur and considers he’s one of India’s success stories. Born into a poor family and taken out of school early, Balram is determined to better himself and rise through the social ranks, by means most foul if necessary. His self-justification for his  ruthless actions is beyond the pale, but I found myself intrigued by him and half-wanting him to succeed, while all the time thinking, No, he can’t be planning that – No, this cannot be about to happen – No, he really has done this horrendous thing.

The novel is an eye-opener, and one that has left me with a more complete picture of India. As David Mattin wrote in his review in the Independent on Sunday, “Adiva sets out to show us a part of [India] that we hear about infrequently; its underbelly”. It is a story about the haves and the have-nots, and one man who talks himself into the coveted job of a driver for a rich man and his wife, learns fast through listening hard and manipulating circumstances in his favour, and, in doing so, decides his employers are undeserving of their privilege and he the more deserving.

The writing is fast-paced, seamless, succinct, and yet richly descriptive. The paragraphs are short, so there is lots of white space (which, in my experience, is unusual for a literary novel). I loved the dialogue, as well as Balram’s inner dialogue. He has to be one of the most intriguing anti-hero I’ve come across in a novel in a long time. I really disliked him as a person, but found myself understanding where he was coming from and wondering if he’d succeed in his quest or end up incarcerated in prison for life.

A highly recommended read.

Author: Sarah Potter Writes

Sarah is a British eccentric who writes offbeat fiction, haiku and tanka poetry. She's into nature, gardening, and natural health. For her, sociability is something that happens in short bursts with long breathing spaces in between.

8 thoughts on “Book Review: The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga”

  1. That just might be worth a read for me. Thank you for the review. I’m in a funk right now regarding reading. Perhaps this will break me out of the reading hiatus.

    Have a splendid Wednesday my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve not been reading as much as I usually do. After finishing this book (which I did a couple of weeks ago), I’ve had difficulty settling down to another one. Instead, I’ve been watching television (mostly crime thrillers), yet could I ever write a crime thriller? I doubt it. At the moment, I’m stuck with my novel-in-progress, or should I call it novel-not-in-progress. I’m 65K into it and, even after a readthrough, I can’t find a way to pull all the threads together in order to mastermind the grand twist that I’m hoping for.

      Despite your good Wednesday wishes, which I very much appreciate, I have reached 4 pm and not written a word of my novel. I now have a headache. I do hope your Wednesday is going better than mine, my friend 😉

      Like

      1. I know just what you mean, Sarah! I have been watching lots of mysteries, crime stories, and thrillers on Britbox! Blue Murder, most recently. I did start a mystery several years ago, and If I find it I might try to finish it. Best to you for yours!

        Liked by 1 person

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